Interviewing both technophile and technophobe users provides useful insights for design.

Cumulative Quiz >>> Interviewing both technophile and technophobe users provides useful insights for design >>> Human-Centered Design: an Introduction

 

Correct! This is a question on extreme users. We can learn from both sides of the spectrum. If designing an email service, for example, it would be important to interview people who handle hundreds of emails daily and those who check email a few times a month.

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Putting irrelevant information into the question sets the user off on the wrong track (esp. when coupled with the “how do you do it” open-ended question, the user is likely to guess “Ah, by how, they mean who…”)

Even though the question is not explicitly leading, by setting the norm (the “several companies” part), it suggests/leads to a favored answer.

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The Wizard of Oz technique is employed to test the interaction and user experience without going through the trouble of creating a fully functional product.

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This is correct! Refer to the slide at 7:50 in the “Creating and Comparing Alternatives” video.

This is correct! Refer to the slide at 7:50 in the “Creating and Comparing Alternatives” video.

This is correct! Refer to the slide at 7:50 in the “Creating and Comparing Alternatives” video.

This is correct! Refer to the slide at 8:20 in the “Creating and Comparing Alternatives” video.

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This allows you to capture data from multiple people at multiple times during the day when they can report on their current state, increasing accuracy.

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Both interfaces are cluttered and have a lot of noise, which makes it hard for users to find and focus on the information they care the most about.

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Outstanding
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The focus with paper prototypes is on high-level design. Paper prototypes are meant to act as “icebreakers” to help get creative juices flowing and start conversation about design ideas.

The goal of paper prototypes is to get feedback from other stakeholders and spark conversation about design ideas. Having multiple prototypes will get you better feedback and better value out of testing multiple designs.

Paper prototypes can be created with any material you have available, there aren’t any rules or limits! By nature, paper prototypes are highly iterative so modifications and ideas can be made and created on the fly.

With pixel-prototypes, you reason what can fit well on a screen and start to invite more formal design critiques. Paper prototypes are meant to be quick and highly iterative.

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Even assuming that a user likes or dislikes a feature can be leading.

Interview questions should require the user to give more in-depth feedback.

Even assuming that a user likes or dislikes a feature can be leading.

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Correct! The storyboard is an exercise that helps communicate what task and need we are trying to design for. Sequence, setting, satisfaction rather than details and specifics of user interface.

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This prototype recreates the most important conditions (remember we’re trying to test “if drivers can understand and respond to your voice directions while driving”), with the lowest cost. In that sense it is the best of the 4 options.

 

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