Moralities of Everyday Life Quiz

Moralities of Everyday Life Quiz Answer. In this post you will get Quiz Answer & Assignment Of Moralities of Everyday Life

 

Moralities of Everyday Life Quiz

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Week 1 Quiz

1.
Question 1
Our intuitions about right and wrong, good and evil, apply to:

1 point

  • What people eat
  • Who people have sex with
  • How people treat strangers
  • All of the above

2.
Question 2
In a study by Thorndike, he asked people how much money he would have to pay them to do certain actions. What did he find?

1 point

  • You have to pay someone a lot more to strangle a cat than to have a front tooth removed with pliers and no anesthesia.
  • You have to pay someone a lot more to have a front tooth removed with pliers and no anesthesia than to strangle a cat.
  • You have to pay someone a lot more to push a man off a bridge to stop a trolley than to switch the trolley onto another track.
  • You have to pay someone a lot more to switch a trolley onto another track than to push a man off a bridge to stop the trolley.

3.
Question 3
The consequentialist approach to moral philosophy is most strongly associated with:

1 point

  • Immanuel Kant
  • Jonathan Haidt
  • Jeremy Bentham
  • Plato

4.
Question 4
Which of the following is a challenge that has been raised against consequentialist moral theories?

1 point

  • The ‘universal rules’ they rely on seem to be arbitrary and culture-specific
  • They lead to conclusions that seem deeply wrong, such as being morally required to murder one person to save five other people.
  • Both of the above.

5.
Question 5
Kant’s ‘Categorical Imperative’ states that the right thing to do is:

1 point

  • the act that would maximize the pleasure of everyone involved.
  • the act that is appropriate given your culture.
  • the act that you would want to have as a universal law
  • the act that has the best consequences.

6.
Question 6
Suppose someone had severe brain damage and could no longer feel emotions. Based on the theory of Joshua Greene and colleagues, how is he most likely to respond to the “switch” versus “bridge” case?

1 point

  • He would throw the switch but not push the man off the bridge.
  • He would push the man off the bridge but not throw the switch.
  • He would throw the switch and push the man off the bridge.
  • He would not throw the switch and would not push the man off the bridge.

7.
Question 7
The “doctrine of double effect” explains our intuitions about the “bridge” case by claiming:

1 point

  • It is always immoral to cause someone harm using your own hands.
  • It is always immoral to cause someone harm in order to bring about a good action.
  • Pushing a man with one’s own hands is emotional; pulling a switch is not.
  • Pushing the man has two effects; pulling the switch has one effect.

8.
Question 8
Experiments have found that if you make people disgusted, this can lead to:

1 point

  • a more forgiving attitude, particularly with regard to sexual behavior.
  • a more forgiving attitude, particularly with regard to violent behavior.
  • more severe moral judgments, particularly with regard to sexual behavior.
  • more severe moral judgments, particularly with regard to violent behavior

9.
Question 9
A study discussed in lecture looked at moral judgments of people whose bodies were more or less visible. This study found:

1 point

  • Focusing on someone’s body makes you worry less about causing the person pain, and makes you see the person as less agentic
  • Focusing on someone’s body makes you worry more about causing the person pain, and makes you see the person as more agentic
  • Focusing on someone’s body makes you worry less about causing the person pain, and makes you see the person as more agentic
  • Focusing on someone’s body makes you worry more about causing the person pain, and makes you see the person as less agentic

10.
Question 10
In lecture, we discussed a study by Ariely and Lowenstein in which male participants answered questions while either sexually aroused or not aroused. One main conclusion of this study was:

1 point

  • Men claim to be more willing to participate in immoral behavior when they are aroused.
  • Men become more consequentialist (and less deontological) when aroused.
  • Men become more deontological (and less consequentialist) when aroused.
  • Men who are aroused are more likely to help strangers—but only female strangers.

11.
Question 11
What is one difference between the views of Haidt and Harris, as represented in their TED talks?

1 point

  • Harris believes that morality is innate; Haidt believes that morality is learned.
  • Harris believes that we are morally similar to nonhuman primates; Haidt believes that we are very different.
  • Haidt believes that we should respect most major moral perspectives; Harris believes that some of them are just mistaken.
  • Haidt argues for utilitarianism; Harris argues against utilitariansim.

12.
Question 12
The view of morality that Harris presents in his TED talk is most similar to that of:

1 point

  • Immanuel Kant
  • John Stuart Mill
  • David Hume
  • Elizabeth Anscombe

13.
Question 13
Harris uses the analogy of __________ to show that although a concept is difficult to define and subject to revision does not make it meaningless.

1 point

  • physical health
  • language
  • religion

14.
Question 14
In his TED talk, Haidt argues that:

1 point

  • The great conservative insight is that order is difficult to achieve.
  • Punishment is essential to promote cooperation in large groups.
  • Both of the above.
  • None of the above.

15.
Question 15
Pinker argues that the moral reputations of Mother Teresa, Bill Gates, and Norman Borlaug don’t match up with the good they have done. Pinker concludes that this shows that people are:

1 point

  • influenced by consequentialism.
  • vulnerable to moral illusions.
  • subject to moral contamination.
  • believers in the conservation of moralization.

16.
Question 16
Pinker hypothesizes that there is a Law of Conservation of Moralization, by which he means:

1 point

  • People who are politically conservative tend to have stronger moral views.
  • Once an act has been judged as immoral, it tends to remain that way.
  • As some old behaviors are taken out of the moral realm, new behaviors are added to the moral realm.
  • A person’s moral views tend to become more conservative over time.

17.
Question 17
Jonathan Haidt argues that the only way that people arrive at moral judgments is by reasoning about the harmful consequences of an act. True or False?

1 point

  • True.
  • False.

18.
Question 18
Which of the following actions is most compatible with a deontological moral view?

1 point

  • Dropping an atomic bomb that kills many innocent people, but ends a war that would kill many more.
  • Hiding an innocent person from a murderer by lying to the murderer about the person’s whereabouts.
  • Refusing to smother a baby, even though its cries will reveal your hiding place and lead to the death of many others.
  • Borrowing money and not repaying it.

19.
Question 19
Singer uses the example of Bob–whose treasured Bugatti will be run over by a train unless he diverts it so that it will kill a small child–to suggest:

1 point

  • we are all in Bob’s situation, and must choose between our luxury possessions and saving the lives of children
  • most people think that it is morally correct to divert the train toward the child
  • people should not be expected to give up their most prized possessions to save the lives of people far away

20.
Question 20
Singer argues that since people have not evolved to sacrifice so much for strangers, it is not morally required for them to do so.

1 point

  • True
  • False

 

 

Week 2 Quiz

1.
Question 1
One effective way to get a psychopath to change his actions is to:

1 point

Threaten him with punishment.

Appeal to his rational nature, e.g. through the principles of utilitarianism.

Appeal to his emotional nature, using vivid examples

2.
Question 2
Adam Smith thought that people were inherently self-interested and greedy. True or False?

1 point

True

False

3.
Question 3
In lecture, we discussed behavior such as writing reviews on the internet and tipping in hotel rooms as examples of:

1 point

choosing to help one person over many.

acts of kindness to strangers without personal reward.

moral actions that are clearly self-interested.

None of the above.

4.
Question 4
Peter Singer developed the short video that we watched in lecture to persuade us to give to people in faraway lands. The video tries to persuade us using:

1 point

appeals to compassion towards those close to us.

appeals to compassion towards family members.

an argument from analogy.

All of the above.

5.
Question 5
Research discussed in lecture suggests that the best way to get people to help others is:

1 point

Show them the name and face of just one person who needs help.

Tell them about five people who need help, but don’t show their faces.

Showing them statistics about how many people need help.

6.
Question 6
Martha Nussbaum was quoted in lecture as arguing that the empathy that is caused by Greek tragedies makes people more selfish. True or False?

1 point

True.

False.

7.
Question 7
There is some evidence that psychopaths generally are unable to identity the following emotion in people’s faces:

1 point

Fear.

Happiness.

Regret.

Anger.

8.
Question 8
In the courtroom, juries are more likely to acquit defendants who are:

1 point

bearded.

masculine-looking.

baby-faced.

ugly.

9.
Question 9
Adam Smith says that any normal person will save the lives of millions of strangers, even at the cost of his or her little finger. Smith thinks this is because emotion is the driving force behind our moral actions. True or False?

1 point

False.

True.

10.
Question 10
In the lecture, it was argued that the notion of impartiality is:

1 point

hard-wired into our brains.

a discovery that has been made over and over again through history.

something discovered by modern Western philosophers.

11.
Question 11
Ronson describes an inmate named Tony, who didn’t want to mingle with the criminals around him. His doctors took this as an indication that:

1 point

he was depressed.

he was sane enough to be released.

he was a psychopath.

12.
Question 12
According to Ronson, the psychologist Robert Hare has found that psychopathy is over-represented in

1 point

artistic people.

CEOs.

scientists.

All of the above.

13.
Question 13
Approximately 1 out of every ___ people is a psychopath.

1 point

100.

1,000,000

10.

1,000.

14.
Question 14
Ronson argues that psychopathy is not all-or-nothing – he thinks a person could be somewhat psychopathic. True or False?

1 point

False.

True.

15.
Question 15
According to Ariely, more funding was allocated to 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina than to the problem of malaria. According to Ariely, which of the following is a psychological factor that contributes to this effect?

1 point

Events such as 9/11 make us more confused.

Events such as 9/11 are more vivid.

Events such as 9/11 happened a long time ago.

16.
Question 16
In an experiment discussed by Ariely, people donated more money to feed a young girl named Rokia than to solve the food shortage in Africa. Ariely argues that the key factor driving this behavior is:

1 point

reason.

self-interest.

empathy.

17.
Question 17
Ariely argues that there is a direct relationship between the size of a problem and how much we care – that is, the bigger the problem, the more we care about it. True or False?

1 point

True.

False.

18.
Question 18
In “Against Empathy”, Bloom argues that:

1 point

empathy and compassion are actually the same

compassion is an extreme form of empathy

it is more moral to be guided by compassion than to be guided by empathy

compassion involves mirroring the feelings of others

19.
Question 19
In “Against Empathy”, Bloom argues that individuals who are low in empathy aren’t necessarily bad people. This is supported by:

1 point

research into the relationship between empathy and aggression

studies of individuals with autism

both of the above

neither of the above

20.
Question 20
In lecture, we watched a short comedy routine by Louis CK in which he said that by spending money on luxuries like nice cars, he was responsible for the deaths of people in other parts of the world. This argument is most similar to the argument of which philosopher?

1 point

Immanuel Kant.

David Hume.

Peter Singer.

 

 

 

Week 3 Quiz

1.
Question 1
Some people believe the only appropriate way to treat their parents’ dead bodies is to eat them and would be appalled by cremation, while others believe the only appropriate way is to cremate the dead. What does this tell us about human morality?

1 point

Cultural practices shape moral beliefs

Some people have a sense of right and wrong, but others do not

There is no structure to human morality

Some people are very hungry, others like fire

2.
Question 2
Which is an example of a cross-cultural moral universal?

1 point

wrongness of intentional assault

sexual modesty

both of the above

3.
Question 3
In this week’s lectures, we discussed many moral principles that seem to be universally shared. This universality means that:

1 point

These principles must be hard-wired

These principles must be selected by evolution

Neither of the above

4.
Question 4
Which condition is NOT required for natural selection to occur?

1 point

Variation

Cooperation

Heredity

Differential reproduction

5.
Question 5
Which of the following is an example of discriminate altruism?

1 point

Giving a warning cry whenever a predator is near

Vampire bats vomiting blood into the mouths of their babies

An animal seeing a predator and running away without giving a warning cry

6.
Question 6
For Dawkins, animals are selfish because genes are selfish.

1 point

True

False

7.
Question 7
In a one-shot prisoner’s dilemma, the prisoner who defects while the other prisoner cooperates is the best off.

1 point

True

False

8.
Question 8
Imagine that you are getting ready to play a series of Prisoner’s Dilemma-type interactions with another person. What is the strategy that will be the most profitable in the long run?

1 point

Always cooperate

Always defect

Choose at random whether you’ll cooperate or defect

Tit-for-tat

9.
Question 9
Which of the following has been found in studies of non-human animals?

1 point

rats will press a bar to let another rat down who has been suspended in the air

non-human primates will refrain from pulling a chain that brings them food, if pulling the chain also shocks another primate

both of the above

10.
Question 10
Dogs seem to dislike distributions where they get less than the dog next to them.

1 point

True

False

11.
Question 11
Like humans, chimpanzees reject low offers when they are recipients in the Ultimatum game.

1 point

True

False

12.
Question 12
The juice study described by Professor Santos suggests that monkeys have desires that are analogous to the human desire for:

1 point

pornography

revenge

humor

music

13.
Question 13
In a series of studies on infants’ understanding of helping versus hindering individuals, researchers at Yale have found that:

1 point

infants distinguished between helping individuals and hindering individuals but only when the actions of individuals influenced the infant in some way

infants preferred helping individuals over hindering individuals even if they weren’t affected by the individuals

infants were equally likely to punish helping individuals and hindering individuals

14.
Question 14
In his article “Morals Without God?”, Frans de Waal argues that:

1 point

A) Culture is what gives rise to moral behavior.

B) Only the human species engages in altruistic behavior

C) Primates like chimpanzees and bonobos will help each other for no personal benefit

D) (a) and (b)

15.
Question 15
In his article “Morals Without God?”, Frans de Waal argues that science is an important and valuable source of moral guidance.

1 point

True

False

16.
Question 16
Which of the following is true of babies?

1 point

They know that unsupported objects will fall down

They can add and subtract small numbers

They expect people to take rational paths to get objects they want

All of the above

17.
Question 17
By the age of about twelve months, babies:

1 point

prefer to look at faces of the race most familiar to them

prefer those who speak their own language to someone who speaks a foreign language

both of the above

18.
Question 18
Studies of social and moral judgments by babies have used:

1 point

puppets

animated movies

both of the above.

19.
Question 19
The “ethics of divinity” which includes the morality of sex and food …

1 point

Shows up in young babies

Is easily explained through natural selection

Neither of the above.

20.
Question 20
Third party punishment—where we want to punish people for being bad to others …

1 point

Shows up in young babies

Is easily explained through natural selection

Neither of the above.

 

 

 

Week 4 Quiz

1.
Question 1
Why might someone want to study moral differences?

1 point

They’re fascinating to us because it’s so difficult to believe that others can truly think different things are right and wrong.

Differences can tell us important things about how moral psychology is structured.

The study of differences provides us a degree of ‘moral humility’—we can see that others are as confident in their moral views as we are in ours.

All of the above

2.
Question 2
If you lived in a society with a strong autocratic rule, fewer rights and more police, you would probably be living in a ______________ society.

1 point

Divinity

Loose

Tight

Collectivist

3.
Question 3
Country X has a large number of people, and has recently experienced several natural disasters resulting in a difficult food shortage and a civil war. Country X is likely to become:

1 point

Looser

Tighter

More collectivist

Less religious

4.
Question 4
If someone slaps a child for no reason, violating the child’s autonomy, this is likely to elicit in others the emotion of:

1 point

Anger

Disgust

Sadness

Contempt

5.
Question 5
Imagine a news story about a man who attacked a group of innocent bystanders. According to research by Morris and Peng, discussed in the lecture, if the story was from a Chinese newspaper it would be particularly likely to focus on:

1 point

The man’s planning and decision making

The man’s mental history

The situation surrounding the man’s behavior

The suffering of individuals within the crowd of bystanders

6.
Question 6
Thomas Sowell characterized liberals as having an unconstrained, or utopian, vision of human nature, and conservatives as having a constrained, or tragic, view of human nature. One problem with this view is:

1 point

Some liberal positions used to be conservative positions, and vice versa

Liberals are more open to new approaches

Conservatives resonate to John Lennon’s song “Imagine”

7.
Question 7
According to studies by Jonathan Haidt on the five domains of morality, liberals are most likely to focus on ________

1 point

Harm and fairness

All domains equally

Purity and hierarchy

8.
Question 8
According to lecture and Daly and Wilson’s book Homicide, what is a primary cause of homicides in the United States?

1 point

Disrespect

Psychopaths

Adultery

Political differences

9.
Question 9
Which of the following is not true about cultures of honor?

1 point

They have more respect for the military

They are more forgiving toward crimes of honor

They are more in favor of capital punishment

They treat men and women pretty much the same

10.
Question 10
Life in the Western frontier, where people could not rely upon the law, and resources of the open range were easily taken, fostered the following society

1 point

Collectivist

Honor

Liberal

Free

11.
Question 11
How might we defend cultures of honor from critics like Pinker, who argue that they increase violence?

1 point

Honor and purity concerns are connected to an elevated conception of a person

It allows us to go beyond consequentialism in a way that fits better with our intuitions

Both of the above

12.
Question 12
Which of these groups has a majority of atheists?

1 point

Lawyers

Athletes

Professors

Elite scientists

13.
Question 13
Based on the data presented in lecture, which is true?

1 point

How much you believe in God is connected to how much you give to charity

Generally, religion causes people to give less to charity

Attendance at religious services is connected to how much you give to charity

Religion is not connected to charitable giving

14.
Question 14
Individuals were primed with religious words before playing the dictator game. What was the result of this?

1 point

There is no effect

Religious words decrease generosity

Religious words increase generosity

15.
Question 15
In Haidt’s book chapter, he talks about the Robber’s Cave experiment, where twelve-year old boys split into two opposing teams. Haidt argues that this study best illustrates:

1 point

The authority/subversion foundation

The care/harm foundation

The loyalty/betrayal foundation

The sanctity/degradation foundation

16.
Question 16
In Haidt’s book chapter, he talks about Armin Meiwes, a cannibal who ate willing victims. Haidt argues that our repugnance towards Meiwes illustrates:

1 point

The loyalty/betrayal foundation

The sanctity/degradation foundation

The authority/subversion foundation

The care/harm foundation

17.
Question 17
In Haid’s book chapter, he argues that the Care/Harm foundation is most related to:

1 point

religious belief

loyalty to one’s group

care for children

18.
Question 18
Studies of disgust sensitivity find that people who are more easily disgusted are more likely to be:

1 point

politically conservative

politically liberal

consequentialists

deontologists

19.
Question 19
In a study described by Pizarro in his TED talk, when people were asked to give their opinion of a variety of social groups, a gross-smelling room made them more negative toward:

1 point

homosexuality

other races

the elderly

all of the above

20.
Question 20
Which of the following statements about disgust is true?

1 point

Disgust is often argued to be an example of a “preadaptation” that evolved for one purpose and is subsequently used for another

Some scholars argue that there is a “wisdom” to disgust

Both are true

 

 

Week 5 Quiz

1.
Question 1
According to Peter Singer, and discussed in this lecture series, a “moral circle” includes:

1 point

Whoever has moral responsibility—individuals you can praise or blame

Whoever has moral value—individuals you wouldn’t want to hurt

Whoever has a moral relationship to you—individuals who have been kind or cruel to you in the past

2.
Question 2
The story of the Good Samaritan is an argument that race/ethnicity should be morally irrelevant, but it does assume the moral relevance of:

1 point

Proximity

Family relationships

Religion

3.
Question 3
Studies of love and friends show that:

1 point

Opposites attract

Similar people tend to be more attracted to each other

Both of the above

4.
Question 4
Using what we know about minimal groups, under what conditions would you likely see in-group bias?

1 point

When groups are assigned by flipping a coin

When groups are based on (supposed) preferences for different artists

When groups are based on t-shirt color

All of the above

5.
Question 5
For a young child, what matters most when choosing who to interact with?

1 point

language

race

neither is relevant

6.
Question 6
Race has always been an important predictor of group membership, so humans are likely to have evolved biases to keep track of other people’s race.

1 point

True

False

7.
Question 7
Studies of mistaken memory find that when people forget who said something, they tend to choose another person of:

1 point

The same gender

The same age

The same team

All of the above

8.
Question 8
The Implicit Attitudes Test demonstrates that:

1 point

people have implicit biases even if they don’t have explicit biases

stereotypes are often accurate

if people are reminded of a negative stereotype for their group, they will perform in keeping with that stereotype

9.
Question 9
Although group stereotypes can often serve as important cognitive heuristics to facilitate our judgment and decision-making, there are reasons not to use them, including:

1 point

They can be inaccurate—stereotypes are often formed based on misinformation

They can be harmful—stereotypes can affect the targets negatively by inducing a sense of threat and anxiety

Both of the above

10.
Question 10
If researchers are interested in studying altruism, the economic game that is best to use is:

1 point

the ultimatum game

the dictator game

11.
Question 11
Critics of laboratory studies of economic behavior have argued that:

1 point

Most people in psychology experiments are WEIRD

Participants might be concerned about their reputation

Giving behavior might differ cross-culturally

All of the above

12.
Question 12
When young children have to choose between getting one and giving one versus getting two and giving three, they typically choose:

1 point

a) to get one and give one

b) to get two and give three

c) boys choose (a) and girls choose (b)

13.
Question 13
Which of these is not a plausible explanation for the expansion of the moral circle over recent history?

1 point

Market economies

Rational deliberation

Biological evolution

14.
Question 14
In Levitt and Dubner’s “Unbelievable Stories About Apathy and Altruism”, they discuss the question of why children visit their elderly parents and they conclude that this is mostly due to:

1 point

pure kindness

self-interest

genetic relatedness

15.
Question 15
In a classic dictator game, people give on average about 20-30%. What happens if both parties are given the same amount to start, and the dictator is allowed to give all her money or take all her partners’ money?

1 point

Most people still give about 20-30% of their money

Most people are more generous, giving over 50% of their money

Most people take some or all of their partners’ money

16.
Question 16
One main conclusion from the Levitt and Dubner article is:

1 point

people are innately altruistic

people are innately selfish

neither of the above

17.
Question 17
According to Robert Wright the growing number of non-zero-sum interactions in the world leads to:

1 point

an increase in-group loyalty

an expanding realm of moral awareness

a focus on those physically close to us

All of the above

18.
Question 18
Wright describes non-zero-sum games as:

1 point

always having a winner and a loser

always having a win-win outcome

mostly taking place between related individuals

none of the above

19.
Question 19
According to the Pinker EDGE talk:

1 point

violence has been increasing over human history

violence has been decreasing over human history

violence has been going up and down in random patters over human history

20.
Question 20
The “Long Peace” refers to:

1 point

the period of relative peace after World War II

the period of relative peace before World War I

Both of the above

 

 

Week 6 Quiz

1.
Question 1
In lecture, we discussed a genetic condition that leads people to be less compassionate and empathetic, more prone to violence, and more likely to go to prison. This example illustrates the argument that:

1 point

People’s actions are heavily influenced by their biology

We all have multiple selves

People do things because of where they are, not who they are

2.
Question 2
Richard Dawkins argues that if our behavior is caused by our genes:

1 point

it will be very difficult to alter it

we should not be held morally accountable

sometimes it will be easily correctable

free will does not exist

3.
Question 3
Critics of Milgram’s studies on obedience have argued:

1 point

Some people resisted authority

Real-world atrocities may be committed by willing perpetrators

The lab setting was novel and perfectly designed to elicit obedience

All of these answers are correct

4.
Question 4
Drawing upon your knowledge from the Stanley Milgram shock experiment, how can you increase the likelihood of getting someone else to obey you when giving orders?

1 point

Being physically close to the person

Wear a white lab coat

Take responsibility for the outcome

All of these answers are correct

5.
Question 5
Which of the following is not true about Stanley Milgram’s famous shock experiment?

1 point

Without an obvious escape route out of a situation, many “normal” people will take extreme action against other individuals when instructed to do so.

Most subjects (i.e., more than 50%) were willing to administer the highest level of shock.

Milgram has been widely criticized by many people inside and outside the field of psychology for his dubious ethics relating to his treatment of research subjects.

Milgram found strong gender and religious differences in people’s willingness to shock another person.

6.
Question 6
In an Israeli study of parole boards, the key factor contributing to denials of parole was found to be:

1 point

perceived guilt of the prisoner

the race of the prisoner

the percentage of the sentence that had been served

whether the board members were hungry

7.
Question 7
In lecture, we saw a video of people watching a hit-and-run car accident but not helping the victim. According to the lecture, what was the major factor that kept them from helping?

1 point

The traffic was too heavy

The victim was of a minority race

There were other people present

The victim was not identifiable

8.
Question 8
People are more likely to helps others if they are standing near a bakery than a clothing shop. This suggests:

1 point

Hunger motivates people to help

People who tend to indulge in pleasures tend to be more helpful

Situational factors a person may not be aware of influence whether they help or not

People who are focused on material goods like clothing tend not to be helpful

9.
Question 9
Which of the following is a good way to overcome the power of the situation?

1 point

Institute forced deliberations (through waiting periods, for example)

Anticipate future situations and orchestrate them to avoid undesired outcome

Make laws

All of these answers are correct

10.
Question 10
Which of the following is an example of self-binding?

1 point

Joe is upset that his son spends too much time on the internet, so Joe puts a device on his son’s computer to keep the son from browsing the web for more than an hour a day.

Bob thinks he will be more likely to hire a secretary who is attractive, but wants to hire the best candidate, so he interviews people over the phone.

Jill sees a man who appears to be having a heart attack, but because there are many people around who are not helping the man, Jill doesn’t help either.

Sara finds a ten-dollar bill on the sidewalk, and then helps an elderly man cross the street.

11.
Question 11
Which is true about the evolutionary theory of group selection?

1 point

It is plainly wrong

Some people, including Darwin, argue that it’s an essential part of a complete theory of morality

It is needed to explain our moral feelings towards groups

12.
Question 12
Which of the following best supports the notion that reason can influence morality?

1 point

The Milgram study

The bystander effect

Adam Smith’s idea that we would sacrifice our little fingers to save a million strangers

The distinction between the “switch” case and the “bridge” case in the trolley problem

13.
Question 13
In The Brain on Trial, Eagleman argues that our behavior is driven by:

1 point

our genes

our environment

both of these answers are correct

14.
Question 14
Eagleman argues that our increasing understanding of the genetic and neurological basis of behavior should lead to:

1 point

a focus on punishing people

a focus on rehabilitating people

both of these answers are correct

15.
Question 15
Tourette’s sufferers, split-brain patients, and those with choleric movements were all examples provided by Eagleman in “The Brain on Trial” to advance one of his main points that:

1 point

Mental illness or injury can befall any of us

The cause of many human behaviors and mental illnesses are still unknown at a neurological level

Human biology and free will are not separable

Normal people choose their actions, while the mentally ill do not

16.
Question 16
In “The War on Reason,” what does Bloom say about social psychology experiments that explore subtle effects of the environment, such as the finding that cleaning your hands makes you more conservative?

1 point

the experiments are done poorly and the results can’t be trusted

the effects might be real, but they are small and might not matter that much in the real world

the effects are powerful and prove that we are ruled by our unconscious

17.
Question 17
In “The War on Reason,” Bloom draws a distinction between the actions of a paranoid schizophrenic and the action of a cold-blooded Mafia hit man. This is:

1 point

the schizophrenic is influenced by the brain; the hit man is influenced by environment

the schizophrenic’s behavior is determined; the hit man’s behavior is free

the hit man has made a reasoned decision; the schizophrenic has not

18.
Question 18
In “The War on Reason,” Bloom discusses Haidt’s moral dumbfounding examples and argues that:

1 point

moral dumbfounding doesn’t exist

moral dumbfounding does exist, but there are a lot of cases where we are not dumbfounded

we are always morally dumbfounded, but this is still compatible with free will

19.
Question 19
OPINION: When it comes to making moral judgments, I think that the most important and interesting factor is:

(Although your response will be marked “Correct,” this question has no right or wrong answer)

1 point

genetics

environment

reason

emotions

20.
Question 20
OPINION: My prediction about the future of morality is that we will become

(Although your response will be marked “Correct,” this question has no right or wrong answer)

1 point

Better people

Worse people

I have no idea!

 

 

 

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